PDA

View Full Version : Pack Mentality: Beach (Book) Season. Best books you have ever read (or read lately).



AzzurriDawg4
06-28-2010, 12:47 AM
If you are like me, the only time you ever read is when you go to the beach. I just never find the time even though I love to read. The beach is when I knock out about 90% of my recreational reading.

Last summer I finally read Catch 22, a classic that is a must read, especially for most of the members of this board, because it is full of sarcastic humor.

Other favorites of mine:

Flyboys - James Bradley (not the same as the weak ass movie that came out a couple years ago - great book about Navy pilots in WWII).
The Heart of the Sea - Nathaniel Philbrick - crazy story about whalers who get shipwrecked and are forced to cannibalism
Blindness - Jose Saramago - not really an all-time favorite, but read it last summer and it was pretty good.

AzzurriDawg4
06-28-2010, 12:47 AM
If you are like me, the only time you ever read is when you go to the beach. I just never find the time even though I love to read. The beach is when I knock out about 90% of my recreational reading.

Last summer I finally read Catch 22, a classic that is a must read, especially for most of the members of this board, because it is full of sarcastic humor.

Other favorites of mine:

Flyboys - James Bradley (not the same as the weak ass movie that came out a couple years ago - great book about Navy pilots in WWII).
The Heart of the Sea - Nathaniel Philbrick - crazy story about whalers who get shipwrecked and are forced to cannibalism
Blindness - Jose Saramago - not really an all-time favorite, but read it last summer and it was pretty good.

AzzurriDawg4
06-28-2010, 12:47 AM
If you are like me, the only time you ever read is when you go to the beach. I just never find the time even though I love to read. The beach is when I knock out about 90% of my recreational reading.

Last summer I finally read Catch 22, a classic that is a must read, especially for most of the members of this board, because it is full of sarcastic humor.

Other favorites of mine:

Flyboys - James Bradley (not the same as the weak ass movie that came out a couple years ago - great book about Navy pilots in WWII).
The Heart of the Sea - Nathaniel Philbrick - crazy story about whalers who get shipwrecked and are forced to cannibalism
Blindness - Jose Saramago - not really an all-time favorite, but read it last summer and it was pretty good.

AzzurriDawg4
06-28-2010, 12:47 AM
If you are like me, the only time you ever read is when you go to the beach. I just never find the time even though I love to read. The beach is when I knock out about 90% of my recreational reading.

Last summer I finally read Catch 22, a classic that is a must read, especially for most of the members of this board, because it is full of sarcastic humor.

Other favorites of mine:

Flyboys - James Bradley (not the same as the weak ass movie that came out a couple years ago - great book about Navy pilots in WWII).
The Heart of the Sea - Nathaniel Philbrick - crazy story about whalers who get shipwrecked and are forced to cannibalism
Blindness - Jose Saramago - not really an all-time favorite, but read it last summer and it was pretty good.

msudogsrule01
06-28-2010, 01:02 AM
In this order 'Tis, Teacher Man, Angela's Ashes. Also, most Crichton stuff. David Sedaris is hilarious. World War Z was a lot better than I thought. Dave Barry, anything. Bill Bryson, especially A Short History of Nearly Everything. A lot of Clancy. Current read, Chasing the Game: America and the Chase for the World Cup by Filip Bondy... excellent read.

1984Dawg
06-28-2010, 01:21 AM
For folks on this board, Friday Night Lights is a great book. Probably the best sports book I've ever read. The movie did notdo it justice.</p>

Mjoelner
06-28-2010, 01:23 AM
Unlike most of his other books, this one is not a western. Its a historial fiction story set in the Middle East around 1300AD.

ETA: The Fist of God by Frederick Forsyth. Yet another historical fiction story set in the Middle East. This time during the Gulf War.
I also like the Ben Rich story of Skunkworks that someone mentioned.
I saw several mention The Count of Monte Cristo. While I've never read the book, I did watch aweek long mini-series (this one http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0167565/) of it complete with subtitles since it was in French. Damn good story. Guess I'll have to read it one day. While the mini-series format was deeper and more complete than the movie that came out a couple of years ago, I'm sure there were probably things that were left out that I'll find in the book. Gotta love a great revenge story and the way he did it.

615dawg
06-28-2010, 01:29 AM
The Leadership of Robert E. Lee.

If you are a history buff and a business person, this will change your life.

Seshomoru
06-28-2010, 01:30 AM
for sitting in the balcony with a cup of coffee in the morning, and a cocktail at sunset. Easy reads and very entertaining. I strongly recommend the Bourne series. The movies are a steaming pile of shit in comparison.

I'll also second the Count of Monte Cristo as maybe the best book I've read.

/Facebook answer: The Bible!!1

LTblows
06-28-2010, 01:37 AM
Finished it a month ago, and it was phenomenal. I only suggest you read it if you understand the basics of bonds though.

Buford T. Justice
06-28-2010, 01:41 AM
True story of Dickie Scruggs, Zach Scruggs, Paul Minor, Joey Langston, etc.

Big Sheep81
06-28-2010, 01:52 AM
Followed by The Longest Day and A Bridge Too Far by Cornelius Ryan. Any Steven Ambrose book.

PTC Dawg
06-28-2010, 01:53 AM
is a good one about the 1916 shark attacks. Makes for a good beach read. Reading The Last Stand by Philbrick now, about Custer and Sitting Bull.

TheStateUofMS
06-28-2010, 02:17 AM
My two favorites. And no I'm not an atheist or buddhist.

hullabaloodog
06-28-2010, 02:26 AM
Blood Meridian - Follows a kid who joins up with the Glanton gang in the 1850s. Best book I've ever read. Violent and beautiful at the same time.
The Road is great as well, and a much easier read for someone who wants to start reading McCarthy.

I just finished reading Suttree. Story about river life in the 1950s around Knoxville. Really funny at times, but sad as well when the characters can't seem to catch a break.

patdog
06-28-2010, 02:28 AM
Also, A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson. And pretty much anything else by either of these two authors.

mstateglfr
06-28-2010, 02:54 AM
The most brutal story ive ever read, heard, or seen. Horrific detailed account of what happened in Sierra Leone. It was an incredible book and kept you interested the entire time, even with all the real life terror.
Friggin tragic.

Optimus Prime 4
06-28-2010, 02:58 AM

mstateglfr
06-28-2010, 02:58 AM
Yep, that was some Rand smack right there.

...and no it wasnt at all serious. It was quite dumb, actually.

SanfordRJones
06-28-2010, 02:59 AM
Classics: Catcher In The Rye, Animal Farm, LOTR trilogy
Sci-Fi: Ender's Game, Earth Abides, The Postman
Fiction: Palahniuk (Fight Club, Choke, Lullaby, Diary, Survivor)
Non-Fiction: In Cold Blood, Mindhunter (about profiling serial killers)
History: Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, The Whisperers (about life under Stalin)
Politics: Economics In One Lesson, End The Fed, Ethics of Liberty
Sports: Moneyball

Germans
06-28-2010, 03:10 AM
Another good non westernLamour is "Last of the Breed"
Currently reading "Blood's a Rover" by James Ellroy. Third in a trilogy - rough, filthy but fascinating historical fiction about the period in US histiory from 1958-1972

Xenomorph
06-28-2010, 03:29 AM
...the 'holy shit' moment in "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo" is absolutely awesome and you will piss off your entire family after that because you won't put the book down.

If you're looking for a more macho read.. Ben Rich's "Skunk Works" is fascinating about Lockheed's years of developing black programs for the CIA. U2 spy plane, SR-71, F-17.

Or pick up Greg Isles (from Vicksburg, no less) "Black Cross". It's a helluva good WWII yarn spanning from modern day back to the war.

Also a great paperback for the beach would be James Clavell's "Shogun".. it's one of my all-time favorite novels. Follow it up with Tai-Pan and Noble House. Great, great reads... and you'll learn a lot about Asia/Hong Kong.

gptdawg
06-28-2010, 03:48 AM
Loved the Travis McGee series back in the day. Also enjoyed the Tony Hillerman series about the Navajo tribal police. Hated to hear he died a year or so ago.

rebelrouseri
06-28-2010, 04:02 AM
should think about getting one and then you can download any book originally published before 1930 for free. I have been reading old Sherlock Holmes and downloaded about 40 free books as well as some other bargains. If you liked Catch 22 make sure you read some Vonnegut like Breakfast of Champions and Slaughterhouse 5. I would recommend A Terrible Glory (about Custer and the Little Big Horn) for history, The Getaway by Jim Thompson, something by McCarthy (No Country for Old Men, Blood Meridian, or The Road), With the Old Breed, Starship Troopers or Stranger in a Strange Land, The Alienist, A Coffin for Demetrios, The Spy Who Came in From the Cold, Berlin Game by Len Deighton.

megadawgmaniac
06-28-2010, 04:06 AM
I am admittedly not an avid reader (heh) but this is one that I bought back in the day.

Also have one called "Dead Solid Perfect" by Dan Jenkins. A buddy gave it to me since I like golf. I haven't read it (see above) but it's described as funny and bawdy.

AA - Facebook answer #2: Playboy!1!!

gtowndawg
06-28-2010, 04:12 AM
if you like crime stories...any Jack Reacher novel (the author is Lee Child).

Optimus Prime 4
06-28-2010, 04:17 AM
is all the stuff about Norway I don't understand, but the context makes it easy. Are the two follow up books as good?

Optimus Prime 4
06-28-2010, 04:18 AM

Subwaydawg
06-28-2010, 04:20 AM
The godfather is probably my favorite ever.

MrHooch
06-28-2010, 04:30 AM
For folks on this board, Friday Night Lights is a great book. Probably the best sports book I've ever read. The movie did notdo it justice.</p>just about to finish... Dumas gets a little long-winded at points but it is a good read.

TheBigDA
06-28-2010, 04:37 AM
Think it will be my next read. About the Saints from Katrina to the Super Bowl.

Optimus Prime 4
06-28-2010, 04:43 AM

sleepy dawg
06-28-2010, 04:50 AM
I probably read at a 2nd grade level, so anything longer than a page is hell for me.

I have to go with a children's book of poetry: A Light in the Attic, by Shel Silverstein

Henry Kissinger
06-28-2010, 04:51 AM
agree on cormac mccarthy. blood meridian and cities of the plain are my favorites, but i like most of his books. wasn't a big suttree fan. outer dark and the stonemason are good. the road and no country for old men are easier to pick up than others.

i like william vollmann, but i mostly read his fiction and not his journalism. some people here might like 2666 by bolano. underworld by don delillo. hemingway wrote good short stories and they're almost always fun to read

SanfordRJones
06-28-2010, 04:54 AM
I haven't read Starship Troopers or Stranger In a Strange Land, but I just read The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress. It was also good. Galapagos by Vonnegut is also good.

Xenomorph
06-28-2010, 04:57 AM
I finally pulled out an atlas of Sweden and Stockholm so I could follow along with where they were in the books.

Xenomorph
06-28-2010, 04:58 AM
*

UpTheMiddlex3Punt
06-28-2010, 04:58 AM
In the middle of Two Towers. For those who have never read it, I just advise you to push through the first half of Fellowship. It moves really slowly before they get to Bree.

Xenomorph
06-28-2010, 05:05 AM
I thought "you know.. I'm gonna read me some Tolkien." After 200 pages I thought "you know.. I'm gonna watch me some movies."

Maybe I should try again.

UpTheMiddlex3Punt
06-28-2010, 05:18 AM
And I know people who hate the movies just because they don't have Tom Bombadil in them. To those complaints I ask what did he have to do with the overall story. He was much more useful as a literary device. The scenes are excised in almost all movie/television adaptations because Chekhov's Gun matters far more in film than in books.

That being said, the movie did make a lot of changes such as character consolidation and elimination, and giving the love story too prominent of a role. Plus Merry and Pippin are made out to be clumsier than they really are in the books. And there was a much greater sense of urgency in the movies. However, a straight up adaptation would have made for a terrible movie.

rebelrouseri
06-28-2010, 05:29 AM
best.

Henry Kissinger
06-28-2010, 05:50 AM
i liked the ending in the books better than the movies. i don't care about tom bambadil at all. i kind of wanted to see the barrow downs. that's it, i liked the movies

SanfordRJones
06-28-2010, 05:56 AM
I read Slaughterhouse 5 and was disappointed. It was good, but I didn't see why it merits so much praise for being an anti-war book, and I am anti-war. Because it is supposedly very pro-war, I have no desire to read Starship Troopers. I do want to read Stranger in a Strange Land, though. I also want to read Cat's Cradle by Vonnegut.

MedDawg
06-28-2010, 06:18 AM
Had great reviews on Amazon and seems really good so far.

http://www.amazon.com/Blood-Angels-Reed-Arvin/dp/006059635X/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1277748904&sr=8-3

Hair of the Dawg
06-28-2010, 06:38 AM
The Man-Eaters of Tsavo - Official account of John Henry Patterson and the attempt to build a rail line while being attacked by two man eating lions., the movie the Ghost and the Darkness were based on this.

Charlie Wilson's War - great book

To Try Men's Souls - Fiction butbased on historical accounts of the crossing of the Deleware and the events that surrounded it. If you can read this book and not feel a sense of awe and patriotisim you must be a terror suspect. Honestly one of the best books i've read in the past 5-10 years.

Hair of the Dawg
06-28-2010, 06:41 AM
nm

hullabaloodog
06-28-2010, 06:50 AM
nm

Mr Meoff
06-28-2010, 07:05 AM
Is The Fountainhead worth a read?

coursesuper
06-28-2010, 07:06 AM
Pure Zen Golf.

rebelrouseri
06-28-2010, 08:17 AM
.

Hotel Roosevelt
06-28-2010, 08:51 AM
All-time? Probably To Kill a Mockingbird, The Sound and the Fury, and Crime and Punishment. A Christmas Carol, Crichton (esp Jurassic Park, book better than the movie), Stephen King, Kafka, and The Great Gatsby.

Non-Fiction? The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt and The Devil in the White City.

Recently? In Cold Blood.

I never really got into Vonnegut myself. Good, but not enthusiastic enough at the moment to read the rest of his work. I'm onboard with McCarthy, Blood Meridian is fantastic. As far as Tolkien, I agree that you may need to push to get through Fellowship. I first read it off-and-on over the course of a year, but then blew through Two Towers and Return of the King. The Hobbit is good too, but don't expect it to be like LOTR. I need to read more Hemingway (maybe give those short stories a try), but I was let down a bit by The Sun Also Rises.

was21
06-28-2010, 08:59 AM
..readable, accurate, and covers the economic, political, social, religious, racial and other aspects of that region from earliest development.

JohnnyAppleseed
06-28-2010, 09:15 AM
by John Grisham is pretty damn good. There's a lot of crazy twists and turns that make it really hard to put down.

MeridianDog
06-28-2010, 10:06 AM
would add Pat Conroy's books Great Santini blows the movie away. Lords of Discipline, Prince of Tides,

would add Larry McMurtry - I still consider Lonesome Dove to be "The Great American Novel" funny serious thought provoking. Texasville - funny, funny LOved everything he ever wrote - even Terms of endearment.

would add Leon Uris as an old writer Exodus,

James Michener - Space, Hawaii, Chesapeake, Texas

If they weren't mentioned

Jaws, The GodFather

Sorry for dumping this on folks

Shelby Foote - The Civil Way: A Narrative - massive three volume set takes a yearto read, but well worth the effort of time becauseNOone put it into words etter than Foote.

dawgoneyall
06-28-2010, 10:18 AM
Earnest Shackelton( story about an expedition to the Antarctic)

Optimus Prime 4
06-28-2010, 10:23 AM
he plays around here a lot.

Bulldog Bruce
06-28-2010, 11:25 AM
From Crichton: Sphere, Congo, State of Fear, Jurassic Park and The lost World are great reads. Any of Clancy's earlier novels are excellent.
All of these are cases where the movies do not do the book justice. the books are MUCH better.

karlchilders
06-28-2010, 11:35 AM
I think it was written by C34.

MeridianDog
06-28-2010, 11:53 AM
I forgot that I knew that.

Never heard him though although I do the blues.

Here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/50765737@N04/
(http://www.flickr.com/photos/50765737@N04/)
Hope this is kosher Maybe the blues is a sport

TheStateUofMS
06-28-2010, 12:01 PM
Is The Fountainhead worth a read?
Yes it is worth the read. It's really long, but you'll get caught up and read 75-100pgs in one sitting. It has about 7 main characters and the characters are very unique and you'll find yourself pulling for certain ones. I'm not an avid reader at all, although I plan on it one day, but I thoroughly enjoyed it.

OrrDawg
06-28-2010, 12:13 PM
.

SLUdog
06-28-2010, 12:15 PM
reading is integral to my job.

tcreb
06-28-2010, 01:46 PM
Very, very funny book featuring the one and only Ignatius J. Reilly.

Beretta
06-28-2010, 02:00 PM
and they are making a movie with spielburg behind the director.....awesome book if you like old school mississippi

RBDog82
06-28-2010, 02:02 PM
The Big Short is a really good account of the financial crisis and how a few fund managers made out like bandits anticipating it.<div>
</div><div>Lone Survivor is first hand account of a battle in Afghanistan involving 200+ Taliban soldiers and 4 Navy SEALs. After reading that book, I put up my skirt and went back to work.</div>

SanfordRJones
06-28-2010, 02:07 PM
I'll put it on my list. Check out the item suggested by other users on the book's Amazon listing (http://www.amazon.com/Breakfast-Champions-Novel-Kurt-Vonnegut/dp/0385334206/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1277777063&sr=8-1).

fredgarvin
06-28-2010, 02:22 PM
The World According to Garp - Weird but a great read.

Maroon Eagle
06-28-2010, 02:50 PM
Some recommendations:

Flann O'Brien: At Swim-Two-Birds & The Third Policeman.
Salman Rushdie: Midnight's Children. (have not read Satanic Verses)
Charles Portis: The Dog of the South. (need to read True Grit sometime)
Neil Gaiman: American Gods, The Graveyard Book, Sandman, Coraline, Stardust, and more. (maybe the best contemporary author at the moment)
Mikhail Bulgakov: The Master and Margarita
Eudora Welty: The Ponder Heart
Ferrol Sams: Run With The Horsemen, The Whisper of the River, When All the World Was Young,
Nick Hornby: Fever Pitch, High Fidelity, About a Boy, Songbook, A Long Way Down
Terry Pratchett: Discworld series, Wee Free Men series. (new Wee Free Men book coming out this fall)
Brad Watson: Heaven of Mercury, Last Days of the Dog-Men (haven't read his latest collection yet though)
Larry Brown: Fay, Joe, Rabbit Factory, Billy Ray's Farm.
Barry Hannah: short stories and The Tennis Handsome.
John Grisham: A Time to Kill, The Firm, The Testament, The Chamber, The Rainmaker.
W.E.B. Griffin: Everything but his Philadelphia cop series (needs a good copy editor though-- usually can find a mistake/typo in his books)
Tom Clancy: All Jack Ryan universe books up to Red Rabbit (Teeth of the Tiger was a bit disappointing but there's a new Jack Jr. book coming out this year supposedly) and Red Storm Rising.
Orson Scott Card: Ender series.
David Brin: Uplift series.
Harry Turtledove: Guns of the South, WorldWar series, etc.
Andrew Vachss: Burke novels.
Richard Stark/Donald Westlake: Everything.

SanfordRJones
06-28-2010, 03:19 PM
You have some good stuff there. I'm reading the Ender series now, and it's very good. I've never read the Uplift series by Brin, but I have read the Postman. It's great, although the movie with Costner is supposedly terrible. I tried to read a couple of different books by Pratchett, and I quit reading both because they sucked. I don't know if they were part of the Discworld series.

Speaking of series, I'm surprised no one has mentioned Harry Potter. Despite all the hype and it essentially being a kids' series, I enjoyed them when I listened to the audio books narrated by Jim Dale. I highly recommend those books for anyone looking for something entertaining to listen to. Dale does a great job.

I also enjoyed the Dark Tower series by Stephen King. The book within the 4th book, Wizard and Glass, taking place before the 1st book when the Gunslinger is a teenager, is one of my favorites.

The Narnia series by CS Lewis is also a great series and theologically as deep as it gets despite it being a series aimed at children. His Space trilogy is also very good.

Maroon Eagle
06-28-2010, 04:21 PM
He does have the occasional book that is not (even the Wee Free Men are considered part of Discworld, but it's a Young Adult oriented series which is very good-- a lot like Harry Potter in that regard) though.

The Uplift books are very good. The Postman is too. I like postapocalyptic fiction so stuff like The Postman, Dark Tower series, S.M. Stirling's Emberverse/Nantucket series, The Stand, A Canticle for Leibowitz, The Road, Swan Song, and Alas, Babylon all appeal to me.

I know that The Postman movie adaptation was panned but I thought it was better than I'd anticipated. Maybe it's because I had low expectations going in because of the bad reviews.

The Narnia series is very good; another very good series from the opposite viewpoint is Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials series. Oh, and since I brought up Stirling, I might as well add that his Draka series is awesome.

FQDawg
06-28-2010, 04:53 PM
Any of the Bryant and May mysteries by Christopher Fowler
"When Christ and His Saints Slept" by Sharon Kay Penman
The Wars of the Roses by Alison Weir - not so much a novel as a history text. Was still pretty good.
Watchmen - read it before the movie came out and couldn't put it down
Also read a lot of Agatha Christie a few summers ago - thank you library. You also can't go wrong with Sherlock Holmes

OneParticularHarbor
06-28-2010, 11:52 PM
Also, the new Scott Turow sequel to "Presumed Innocent", called "Innocent" is a good read. If you want some Mississippi flavor, pick up something by Larry Brown. Jeff Shaara's trilogy on WWII is pretty well done. I just got into Cormac McCarthy, very intense stuff. Leigh Montville's bios on Ted Williams and Babe Ruth are good. So is David Maraness' bio of Vince Lombardi "When Pride Still Mattered". And anything by Tom Wolfe. And since the 4th is coming up, try David McCullough's "John Adams" and "1776".</p>